Article of the Month

    

Dear colleagues and airway enthusiast 
The European Airway Management Society is introducing a new feature – Article of the Month. 
This is designed to provide an opportunity to our members to highlight and share airway related topics and to open discussion forums in order to share clinical experience for the benefit of all EAMS members. 
The Article of the Month will be made available via the EAMS website and is going to be accompanied by a short text (up to 200 words) explaining why is this article being selected. 
EAMS members with login to eamshq.net will have access to the articles as full-text PDF's.
We would like to encourage our members to propose articles of the month. The short text accompanying the article will also be made available on line with full acknowledgement of the author who proposed the article. 
The final decision to go on-line will be taken by the EAMS Board of Directors. 

Best regards 
R. Tino Greif 
President of the European Airway Management Society

    

Emergency front-of-neck access (eFONA) is one of the most feared clinical interventions any of us is likely to face. Unfortunately, current evidence does not seem to provide enough guidance as to what is the most effective way of dealing with the dreaded can’t intubate can’t oxygenate scenario.

In this study, Rees et al have compared cannula and scalpel-bougie  eFONA techniques using time to oxygen delivery as their primary outcome. The value of this study is, perhaps, not as much in the main findings as it is in the analysis of failures and repeated attempts. Rees et al. found that the participants had lower odds of failure using cannula (one failure) than using scalpel – bougie technique (15 failures).

Knowing how and why failures happen can be invaluable and is likely to help individual anaesthetist make a more informed decision about what eFONA technique is likely to suit better their clinical environment and skill mix. Well worth reading.

Rees KA, O’Halloran LJ, Wawryk JB, Gotmaker R, Cameron EK, Woonton HDJ: Time to oxygenate for cannula- and scalpel-based techniques for emergency front-of-neck access: a wet lab simulation using an ovine modelAnaesthesia 2019; Early View.

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