Article of the Month

    

Dear colleagues and airway enthusiast 
The European Airway Management Society is introducing a new feature – Article of the Month. 
This is designed to provide an opportunity to our members to highlight and share airway related topics and to open discussion forums in order to share clinical experience for the benefit of all EAMS members. 
The Article of the Month will be made available via the EAMS website and is going to be accompanied by a short text (up to 200 words) explaining why is this article being selected. 
EAMS members with login to eamshq.net will have access to the articles as full-text PDF's.
We would like to encourage our members to propose articles of the month. The short text accompanying the article will also be made available on line with full acknowledgement of the author who proposed the article. 
The final decision to go on-line will be taken by the EAMS Board of Directors. 

Best regards 
R. Tino Greif 
President of the European Airway Management Society

    

Dear Colleagues;

This month, the articles are related with tracheal extubation. The first paper is a guideline on ‘’Intubation and extubation of the ICU patient’’. You will find recommendations from experts of the SFAR and SRLF.

Quintard H, l'Her E, Pottecher J, Adnet F, Constantin JM, De Jong A, Diemunsch P, Fesseau R, Freynet A, Girault C, Guitton C, Hamonic Y, Maury E, Mekontso-Dessap A, Michel F, Nolent P, Perbet S, Prat G, Roquilly A, Tazarourte K, Terzi N, Thille AW, Alves M, Gayat E, Donetti L. Intubation and extubation of the ICU patient. Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med 2017 Oct;36(5):327-341.

No abstract available

The second paper is again from France: a randomised controlled trial  which compares suction with positive pressure before extubation in adult patients.

L'Hermite J, Wira O, Castelli C, de La Coussaye JE, Ripart J, Cuvillon P. Tracheal extubation with suction vs. positive pressure during emergence from general anaesthesia in adults: A randomised controlled trial. Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med 2017 Sep 4. pii: S2352-5568(17)30001-2. doi: 10.1016/j.accpm.2017.07.005. 

Abstract:
After general anaesthesia (GA) in adults, the optimal tracheal extubation technique (positiveBackground: After general anaesthesia (GA) in adults, the optimal tracheal extubation technique (positivepressure or suctioning) remains debated. The primary endpoint of this study was to assess the effects ofthese techniques on onset time of desaturation (SpO2 < 92%).Methods: Sixty-nine patients with a body mass index < 30 scheduled for elective orthopaedic surgerywere allocated to positive pressure (PP) or suctioning (SUC) group. GA was standardised with propofoland remifentanil via target-controlled infusion. A morphine bolus of 0.15 mg/kg was administered 20–30 mins before the end of surgery. The effect of extubation technique on onset time of desaturation (T92)was assessed during the first 10 mins after extubation during the spontaneous air breathing. Secondaryendpoints included: frequency of desaturation, respiratory complications, need to use oxygen therapyand SpO2 at the end of the first hour while breathing in air (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01323049).Results: Baseline patient characteristics and intraoperative management data for the 68 patientsincluded had no relevant clinical difference between groups. T92 (sec) after tracheal extubation was 214(168) vs. 248 (148) in the PP and SUC groups, respectively (P = 0.44). In the PP and SUC groups, 50 and43% reached a SpO2 < 92% within the first 10 mins after extubation respectively (P = 0.73). There were nostatistically significant differences between groups for any secondary endpoints.Conclusions: Positive pressure extubation as compared with suctioning extubation did not seem to delayonset time of desaturation after GA in standard weight adult patients.

Please be aware that the full texts will be provided to EAMS members with login to eamshq.net.

With best wishes
Kemal Tolga Saracoglu
Co-secretary of the European Airway Management Society

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